How Social Media Is Responsible For Lindsay Lohan’s Comeback

Sponsored by LindsayLohan

How Social Media Is Responsible For Lindsay Lohan’s Comeback

Alyssa Girdwain

Scott Carlsen

Sponsored by Lindsay Lohan

Lindsay Lohan doesn’t need an introduction. We know her as an iconic actress who starred in some of the most influential movies that sculpted pop culture: “Mean Girls,” “Freaky Friday,” and the Disney Channel Original Movie “Get A Clue.” Honestly, I challenge you to go one week without a friend rattling off a “Mean Girls” reference — it’s near impossible.

But that’s not all Lindsay is capable of. As any millennial in 2017 knows, the best way to start anew is to shut down all of your social media accounts and rebrand.

That’s what Lohan did in early January. Her Instagram and Twitter went dark, a move that signified the start of her “period of renewal,” her manager Scott Carlsen told “Us Weekly.” Now, for the first time, Lohan is defining herself on her own terms and taking control of her destiny.

In a recent interview with “The View,” Lohan proved she’s taken control of her narrative and spoke with a serene air of someone who’s “found solace” on the other side of 30. In her foray into spirituality and self-reflection, it seems Lohan’s got her act together — for real, this time.

Since getting back online, Lohan’s social media feeds have been her biggest mouthpiece, used to reignite her career through homegrown efforts to snatch movie roles, announce clothing lines and introduce personal transformations. Her Instagram bio, “Alaikum salam” an Arabic phrase translated to “and unto you peace” triggered theories that she converted to Islam. She never confirmed or denied these rumors, because she had no reason to. Only Lindsay speaks for Lindsay.

It’s only sensible that Lohan would follow her own digital reinvention with a social media-themed show. In “The Anti-Social Network,” a show produced by Band of Outsiders that is being shopped around to various networks, Lohan hijacks a person’s social media accounts for 24 hours and dares them to complete embarrassing challenges to win prizes. Her pranks challenge people to evaluate how much their social media is actually worth. It’s reminiscent of the early 2000s prank show, “Punk’d,” headed by the dreamy Ashton Kutcher. He pranked Lohan herself in an episode from 2003. But this time, Lohan is the secret mastermind behind the hidden cameras.

Lohan is well aware of how she’s judged through her actions on social media and the premise of the show is based on what Lindsay has been through. “The Anti-Social Network” will mirror Lindsay’s experience with the media by opening people up to the same criticism and pressure she’s felt all her life. Through these shared experiences, people will get a better sense of what it feels to live like Lindsay.